Intraocular pressure variation during episodes of pigment dispersion, and its relationship with the development of secondary glaucoma Academic Article in Scopus uri icon

Abstract

  • © 2017 Sociedad Mexicana de Oftalmología. Objective: To determine the intraocular pressure variation during acute attacks of pigment dispersion and its relationship with the development of pigmentary glaucoma. Methods: Retrospective, observational, and descriptive study of patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. Intraocular pressure was recorded by Goldman tonometry during acute attacks of pigment dispersion, after cessation, and until last follow-up visit. Results: We analyzed 13 patients; 9 women (69.2%) and 4 men (30.8%), with a mean age of 51.76. years. The minimum follow-up time was 12 months. During the acute phase of pigment dispersion, the mean intraocular pressure was 23.3. ±. 8.6. mmHg, dropping to 15.2. ±. 2.4. mmHg after the event (P <. .0001). Only 5 (38.4%) patients ended up developing pigmentary glaucoma. The mean intraocular pressure of patients with pigment dispersion syndrome during the acute event was 22.5. ±. 10.6. mmHg, compared to 24.6. ±. 4.0. mmHg of those who developed pigmentary glaucoma (P = .0365). Conclusions: We found an elevated intraocular pressure in all patients analyzed during acute attacks of pigment dispersion. The intraocular pressure variations, along with its persistent elevation, and the appearance of the optic nerve and cup-to-disk ratio should be considered as potential risk indicators for the development of pigmentary glaucoma in these patients.

Publication date

  • January 16, 2017